Tag Archives: divorce

“My wife married five men, all of which were me.”

I’m taking today to share with you just a golden video of wisdom from three great men I highly admire.  John Piper pastor of my youth, Tim Keller excellent author on making timeless truths relevant for the modern day man, and DA Carson one of the most respected scholars in my book.

Together they’re talking about the covenant of marriage, and how that covenant, not the feeling of being in love, will be sustaining power in a marriage.  So worth the listen.

Notable excerpts:

Tim Keller: “My wife married five men.  All of which were me….hes trying to get across the fact you change, and your spouses change….when you get married you change each other.”

John Piper: “[Covenant] is the ground where the flower grows.  If you are in a season where your flower is wilted and you think the solution is to pull the plant up out of the ground, thats not the solution.  The ground of covenant, the ground of promise, the ground of “no divorce, maybe murder” is the ground where the flower can flourish again.  And my life is a testimony of 42 years of falling in love with my wife all over again…”

The original link can be found here.

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Marriage gap forming in America, based on new study

Original article is found here, on CNN.

The retreat from marriage in Middle America is not a retreat from bearing children. Wedding bands may be out of vogue, but in Middle America, women pushing strollers, diaper bags slung over their shoulders, infants hidden in bundles of blankets, are as common a sight as ever.

But children who grow up in Middle America today are far less likely to grow up with their own parents than they were 30 years ago. By contrast, a greater proportion of children in upscale America live with their mothers and fathers today than they did 30 years ago…..

What should we do?

We don’t go about insisting that the poor are better off left alone in their poverty — as if this were a state they chose and should remain in. Instead, we recognize poverty as an injustice. We set about helping the less fortunate find fortune.

It’s the same with the growing, class-based marriage gap. We can’t just put a bandage on the injustice by, for instance, providing support groups only to single parents, albeit support groups certainly can help. Instead, we should help couples, too, achieve the stability for which they long.”

In the article, she poses the question, “What should we do?”  Perhaps having big high-way banners that say, “Need a divorce?  Call us for help” making a decision like that as easy as calling a bill-board number.

What do you think?